Category Archives: Healthy Weight Loss Tips

Follow me at my new site . . .

Just wanted to post another invitation to follow me at my new website, lmwellness.com.  I notice that there are still a number of people who are visiting this site (kimthedietitian.com), yet I have not posted in many months.  I fear they must think I am lazy!  Not so.  I have just been posting in a different place.  Join me there!

Please Follow Me At My New WordPress Website!

After years of posting as Kim the Dietitian, I have now taken my blog over to my new website, lmwellness.com.  Please follow me there!

My wellness company, Lifestyle Matters, has some great mindful eating tools for individuals and corporate wellness, and I will continue to write on the blog there.  Please check it out.  Let me know what you think.  Thank you for visiting my site over the years . . . health and happiness!

What and When to Eat: always, sometimes, and never

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Always? Sometimes? Never? It depends . . .

Wouldn’t you like to know?!  We all love black and white information, especially about eating.  “I want to KNOW,” you may say, “exactly what to eat and what I should never touch.”

I am sorry to disappoint, but you will not get that here.  One of the problems I have with traditional dieting is that many of them offer lists like this.  As a culture, we love that!  “All I need to do is cut sugar (and/or wheat, gluten, dairy, carrots (!), . . . ) completely out of my diet and I will get to my dream weight and stay there for as long as I live.”

Good luck with that.  I don’t see that strategy offering long-term success to anyone I have met.  Unless a sharply defined eating rule has personal meaning for you, forget it; it will not stick.  If, however, you break out in hives all over your body when you eat even a single slice of bread, I would imagine you would have a relatively easy time giving up gluten if you can pin down the cause of your breakout to any food containing it.

What about WHEN to eat?  Many diets convey the message that if you want to lose weight, you should sometimes eat when you are hungry (when your diet plan makes it possible), never eat simply for pleasure, and never eat when you are emotional.

Here is how I feel about that:

You should always eat when you are physically hungry.  (There is no better reason to eat than this!)

You should sometimes eat for pure pleasure.  (Why not?  If you can supplement food pleasure with other life pleasures, a healthy diet can include some food for the sole purpose of taste enjoyment.  It won’t take much to satisfy a pure pleasure need.  Not being able to stop is a reminder that there is something else going on.)

Eating mindlessly for emotional reasons, with no physical hunger, will never resolve the emotional difficulty, but you will sometimes do it anyway, and you should never beat yourself up about it.  You will always be human.

It’s not just WHAT you eat, but HOW you eat as well.

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How you eat matters.  A recent study supports what seems obvious to me:  a pleasant, relaxing eating experience leads to healthier food choices and better health.

So many people race out the door, grabbing something as they go, or they graze all day long without ever sitting down to enjoy their food.  The study looked at the eating habits of over 1000 college and university students and found that those who prepared food at home and had a set eating schedule ate healthier than those who ate “on the fly,” grabbed food at school or were distracted by video games or TV.

What a shame to miss the experience of eating!  It should be pleasurable; in my opinion, eating is one of the great pleasures of life.  Being more mindful of the experience is not only healthier, but it’s also much more enjoyable.

I know we are all in a hurry, but we can all stretch ourselves a bit to improve the experience surrounding eating.  If you never cook at home, why not try a slow cooker as the weather gets colder?  There are easy recipes that take only 10-15 minutes to assemble.  It doesn’t take any longer to order and grab takeout food.

And how about just sitting?!  If you grab something on the go, sitting really doesn’t take much more effort than standing.  In fact it is so much more relaxing.  If you are someone who drives and eats . . . bad idea!  You could have an accident or arrive somewhere with embarrassing stains on your clothes.

Start where you are and build a more pleasant routine surrounding meals.  When was the last time you lit a candle and set the table?  Even if you live alone, this transforms a meal into a relaxing moment.  It may be the only time you get to relax all day, so making it a habit makes it happen.

Want to change your body? First accept it as it is.

Someone once said to me, “Kim, the doctor just told me that I am obese.”  She sounded devastated . . . and desperate.  “Obese” is such an emotional term for many people.  It is technically defined by a certain body mass index (BMI).  Defined in this way, it is very mathematical, very exact, and simply factual.  It is a number after all, not a feeling, right?  Or is it?

In fact, being labeled obese has a very emotional meaning for many people.  “Obese” can feel like a judgmental term.  When one is told they are obese, it often sounds more like “You are really, really fat.”  Panic is a natural reaction, along with shock in many cases:  “UGH, I had no idea I was THAT fat!”

Whether someone has just learned they are clinically obese or has just felt “really, really fat,” the results seem to be the same.  Feeling unacceptably fat appears to make it harder for people to lose weight; in fact, it looks like it might cause them to gain.  Recent research on the subject was really no shock to me.

I have been telling weight loss clients for years that the first step toward improvement is accepting where they are.  Then, putting a focus on changing behaviors instead of obsessing over numbers will help with forward movement in a healthy direction.  Once this happens, tension releases, desperation lightens, and change is possible.  The alternative is lots of stress, often using food as a soother, leading to weight gain, not loss or even maintenance.

The research report states that three studies “found consistent evidence that perceiving oneself as being overweight was associated with increased weight gain.” In fact, even people who just felt overweight (but were not) gained.  The perception seems to be the important point.  This makes perfect sense, since what we perceive is what affects emotions, not necessarily what is actual, factual reality.

“Individuals who identified themselves as being ‘overweight’ were more likely to report overeating in response to stress and this predicted subsequent weight gain,” according to the authors. “These findings are in line with recent suggestions that the stress associated with being part of a stigmatised group may be detrimental to health.”

The report also noted that the gains may have come from emotional reactions to being considered unacceptable, OR they may have been the result of aggressive dieting.  Brilliant!  Can we finally all agree that crazy, rigid dieting is not effective . . . unless of course you are trying to GAIN weight.

Do you think you have a “willpower disability”?

I have a client on my mind.  We met this morning, and the conversation was interesting.  “I am struggling,” she said.  I found myself asking lots of questions to understand exactly what the struggles are and what is causing them.

What I learned was that she is still having trouble controlling sweets at work. (People bring them in.)  After digging deeper, we discovered that she really doesn’t think she can resist eating the treats at work.  Although she avoids the room they are typically in, all it takes to trigger the “I can’t resist it” belief is the mention of cake or other treats by a co-worker.

She does feel conscious of the fact that there is a choice to eat it or not, but in reality it is not a choice at all.  The mindless part of the habit is in the deeper belief that she cannot resist  treats when they are available.  Checking with herself in-the-moment about whether or not to indulge is really just going through the motions.  The deeper (and less conscious) belief tells her she is not strong enough to really have a choice.  Call it a perceived “willpower disability.”

Add to this challenge the guilt that accompanies the inevitable “choice,” and it adds fuel to the fire of the belief:  “See, I knew I couldn’t resist.  I never can.”

Beliefs are strong.  And they are most often unconscious.  This can make a “conscious” thought a mere habit instead of a realization of actual choice.  There is a big difference between realizing on a superficial level that you can eat something or not, and really believing it.  In other words, it is possible to choose to eat something and also truly believe that there was a choice not to eat it.  In order for the latter choice to exist at all, one must believe that this is possible, at least sometimes.  And, of course, there are all kinds of choices that exist between the two extremes of all and nothing.

Being conscious of thoughts is important, but sometimes it takes looking deeper, especially when feelings of failure and disappointment keep popping up.  If the thought of an option to make a self-controlled choice is habitually followed by discouraging thoughts (“What makes you think you really have any choice at all, you spineless disappointment?”), those thoughts probably point to a deeper belief that keeps that habit going.

To be clear, it is still a good idea to keep from deliberately making choices too challenging by surrounding yourself with temptation.  Let’s face it – some kinds of food are just really, really hard to resist when they are too accessible.  There is no need to test your strength by leaving a whole cake out on the counter.  That’s just not very kind!

Choosing to eat any particular food is not the problem.  Knowing you could choose not to have something and having it anyway feels so much different than eating it because you feel too weak-willed to have any choice.  How much enjoyment can there really be in that?

Do you eat your way out of confinement?

My daughter has a new dog.  Dolly is sweet and cuddly, but there are problems with her roaming the house alone.  For one thing, there is another dog, one who is not exactly thrilled to have a newcomer taking away her status as “only child.”

Crating Dolly seemed like the answer.  It would separate the dogs while my daughter was away, preventing potential conflict.  Sounds like a good solution, right?  There was only one problem . . . a BIG one.  She cannot tolerate the confinement.

When she was left in a wire sided crate, she managed to open the door and get out.  My daughter found her loose in the house.  The next step was to try a plastic sided crate.  She couldn’t open the small door to it, but – believe it or not – she did manage to CHEW through the side of the crate!  She literally ate her way out.

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Can you believe she ate through the plastic on this kind of crate?!

Confinement in the house is fine, because it is a bigger space, but that little box was not at all OK with Dolly.  After consulting a dog trainer, my daughter was told that she probably cannot be crated.

I could not help but think about how this applies to setting boundaries with eating.  We all have a need for some boundaries.  Without them, there is no feeling of control at all, and that feels awful.  But boundaries that are too confining are miserable and ineffective.

And, like Dolly, when the rules are too rigid, we too will “eat our way out.”  We all are different relative to the amount of wiggle room we need, but we are all similar in our need for comfort within the boundaries.  Some dogs do fine in crates – in fact they feel cozy and comfortable – while others like Dolly just need more room.

If you often find yourself eating your way out of your eating plan, you may want to ask if you need a different plan.  It just makes sense.

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Hello, Dolly!