Category Archives: What’s News?

Follow me at my new site . . .

Just wanted to post another invitation to follow me at my new website, lmwellness.com.  I notice that there are still a number of people who are visiting this site (kimthedietitian.com), yet I have not posted in many months.  I fear they must think I am lazy!  Not so.  I have just been posting in a different place.  Join me there!

Please Follow Me At My New WordPress Website!

After years of posting as Kim the Dietitian, I have now taken my blog over to my new website, lmwellness.com.  Please follow me there!

My wellness company, Lifestyle Matters, has some great mindful eating tools for individuals and corporate wellness, and I will continue to write on the blog there.  Please check it out.  Let me know what you think.  Thank you for visiting my site over the years . . . health and happiness!

It’s not just WHAT you eat, but HOW you eat as well.

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How you eat matters.  A recent study supports what seems obvious to me:  a pleasant, relaxing eating experience leads to healthier food choices and better health.

So many people race out the door, grabbing something as they go, or they graze all day long without ever sitting down to enjoy their food.  The study looked at the eating habits of over 1000 college and university students and found that those who prepared food at home and had a set eating schedule ate healthier than those who ate “on the fly,” grabbed food at school or were distracted by video games or TV.

What a shame to miss the experience of eating!  It should be pleasurable; in my opinion, eating is one of the great pleasures of life.  Being more mindful of the experience is not only healthier, but it’s also much more enjoyable.

I know we are all in a hurry, but we can all stretch ourselves a bit to improve the experience surrounding eating.  If you never cook at home, why not try a slow cooker as the weather gets colder?  There are easy recipes that take only 10-15 minutes to assemble.  It doesn’t take any longer to order and grab takeout food.

And how about just sitting?!  If you grab something on the go, sitting really doesn’t take much more effort than standing.  In fact it is so much more relaxing.  If you are someone who drives and eats . . . bad idea!  You could have an accident or arrive somewhere with embarrassing stains on your clothes.

Start where you are and build a more pleasant routine surrounding meals.  When was the last time you lit a candle and set the table?  Even if you live alone, this transforms a meal into a relaxing moment.  It may be the only time you get to relax all day, so making it a habit makes it happen.

Want to change your body? First accept it as it is.

Someone once said to me, “Kim, the doctor just told me that I am obese.”  She sounded devastated . . . and desperate.  “Obese” is such an emotional term for many people.  It is technically defined by a certain body mass index (BMI).  Defined in this way, it is very mathematical, very exact, and simply factual.  It is a number after all, not a feeling, right?  Or is it?

In fact, being labeled obese has a very emotional meaning for many people.  “Obese” can feel like a judgmental term.  When one is told they are obese, it often sounds more like “You are really, really fat.”  Panic is a natural reaction, along with shock in many cases:  “UGH, I had no idea I was THAT fat!”

Whether someone has just learned they are clinically obese or has just felt “really, really fat,” the results seem to be the same.  Feeling unacceptably fat appears to make it harder for people to lose weight; in fact, it looks like it might cause them to gain.  Recent research on the subject was really no shock to me.

I have been telling weight loss clients for years that the first step toward improvement is accepting where they are.  Then, putting a focus on changing behaviors instead of obsessing over numbers will help with forward movement in a healthy direction.  Once this happens, tension releases, desperation lightens, and change is possible.  The alternative is lots of stress, often using food as a soother, leading to weight gain, not loss or even maintenance.

The research report states that three studies “found consistent evidence that perceiving oneself as being overweight was associated with increased weight gain.” In fact, even people who just felt overweight (but were not) gained.  The perception seems to be the important point.  This makes perfect sense, since what we perceive is what affects emotions, not necessarily what is actual, factual reality.

“Individuals who identified themselves as being ‘overweight’ were more likely to report overeating in response to stress and this predicted subsequent weight gain,” according to the authors. “These findings are in line with recent suggestions that the stress associated with being part of a stigmatised group may be detrimental to health.”

The report also noted that the gains may have come from emotional reactions to being considered unacceptable, OR they may have been the result of aggressive dieting.  Brilliant!  Can we finally all agree that crazy, rigid dieting is not effective . . . unless of course you are trying to GAIN weight.

More Local News about “In the Moment – Mindful Eating” App

This one was a surprise!  A co-worker said her husband heard the app discussed on the WTMJ morning news show.  (Click the link to check it out.)

“In the Moment – Mindful Eating” App in the news!

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On Monday, a nice article in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel talked about the phone app I developed.  I thought the writer, Lori Nickel, did a nice job of understanding my passion and translating it into a very readable format.  (Just click the link to read it.)

There is still no “one size fits all” plan for a healthy weight.

What is the biggest cause of on and off dieting, up and down weight, and frustration with weight loss? I believe it is the practice of any plan that doesn’t feel like a comfortable enough fit for you!

This meta analysis of different weight loss plans finds little difference in weight loss after 6 months between nutritionally different plans. People lost weight overall on all of the plans studied, and some may keep it off, but sustainability will depend on how realistic the changes are for the individual.

It always comes back to this: For lasting health improvements, make changes thoughtfully, considering all of your tendencies and current situational factors. Any plan will need to be flexible enough to allow for LIFE! A plan can be loosely defined (ie. choosing to eat more vegetables every day or simply being more mindful of hunger patterns) or it may contain more distinct components to it (ie. what each meal will contain or keeping track of carb grams if blood sugar is “jumpy”), but any plan needs to be “chosen” not forced. There has to be a reason that makes sense – to you. Attitude is the key.

I always return to the big question that seems to say it all . . . “Does what I am doing now feel KIND?”